When is a grazings share deemed to be a croft?

Many crofters may be unaware that following the purchase of croft land, any associated common grazings shares, which remain tenanted, are deemed to be a separate and distinct croft in their own right for the purposes of the Crofters (Scotland) Act 1993.

This is to ensure that the right to graze is still subject to crofting controls and regulations, which is why many owner-occupier crofters will have received several Crofting Census forms to complete and return to the Commission for both their croft and for their grazings share.

The Crofting Commission has completed, as it is required to by crofting legislation, the separation of crofts and deemed crofts (grazings shares and, where appropriate, apportionments) in the Register of Crofts. 1,952 deemed crofts now have their own separate entry as a croft with their own unique register number. Where the croft has to be registered in Registers of Scotland’s Crofting Register, the deemed croft will have to be registered separately.

The practicalities of having a deemed croft has little implication for crofters in that the grazings shares remain active. However, when it does become important is with the sale or transfer of a croft and croft succession on the death of a crofter.

Where an owner-occupier crofter sells or transfers their croft, only the owner-occupied croft will transfer to the new owner. The deemed croft (whether it is a right to graze or an apportionment) remains held in tenancy and it can only be transferred by making an assignation application to the Commission. Similarly, any let or short lease of the     owner-occupied croft will not include the deemed croft. It is not uncommon for a deemed croft, comprising a right to graze in a common grazings, to be forgotten about in the sale of a croft.

The other situation where deemed crofts can cause problems is in connection with the transfer of crofting interests on death. Executors should identify whether the crofting interests of the deceased crofter include a deemed croft. Where the deceased crofter purchased their croft, any right to graze or apportionment that was not included in the purchase will be a deemed croft, and will be deemed to be held in tenancy.

Executors need to be aware that any deemed croft must be transferred in terms of the Succession (Scotland) Act 1964 and it is recommended that legal advice is sought. If the deemed croft is not transferred within 24 months of the crofter’s death, or 24 months after the Commission was notified of the death (which must be within 2 months of the date of death), the executor may lose the ability to transfer the deemed croft and the landlord may terminate the tenancy of the deemed croft. The Commission may also then take steps to declare the deemed croft to be vacant.

www.crofting.scotland.gov.uk